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Month: November 2018

Are social media posts badly misinformed? Probably

Are social media posts badly misinformed? Probably

In light of the survey finding most voters are badly misinformed on well known and popular public policy issues the same is likely true about social media posts. It is likely that more than half of political or policy oriented social media posts are incorrect. But depending on who makes the posts, and how many followers they have, their incorrect posts can be influential – and plant non factual and illogical constructions in the minds of their targets.

Survey finds most voters are badly misinformed about well known policy topics

Survey finds most voters are badly misinformed about well known policy topics

A survey finds that most voters are badly misinformed about popular policy topics. Literally, what they know is wrong – per the facts. This is not an opinion survey but a knowledge survey. Take the survey yourself – how well do you score on these knowledge topics? Consider the role that propaganda plays in misinforming voters, and how opinion polls of misinformed voters are then used to influence policy.

Ignorance contributes to the effectiveness of propaganda

Ignorance contributes to the effectiveness of propaganda

Democrats won the popular vote in the U.S. Senate, therefore the 2018 election is unfair, says the meme. Sounds convincing – until you see this claim taken apart by the Washington Post. In fact, Democrats won 22 of the 35 seats or 65% of the seats while receiving just 55% of the total votes. Read the whole thing. This is an example of propaganda messaging that uses the “What you see is all there is” method. Also see thelogical fallacy of implying a vote of 1/3d of the Senate seats is a vote of 100% of Senate seats, fooling the target of the propaganda messaging.