Climate communications and Journalism’ish: Crisis, Emergency, Deniers and the language of propaganda in The Guardian

Climate communications and Journalism’ish: Crisis, Emergency, Deniers and the language of propaganda in The Guardian

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The Guardian has issued staff guidelines for how to use terminology in association with climate communications stories.

Rather than using facts of CO2 rising, sea level ice and temperature changes, ice mass changes the following pejorative terms are to be used. Anyone who does not 100% adopt The Guardian’s perspective is to be officially labeled a “denier” (name calling, transference from “Holocaust denier”, get on the bandwagon). The word “climate” should be associated with “crisis”, “emergency” or “heating” (transference, fear).

1.) “climate emergency” or “climate crisis” to be used instead of “climate change”

2.) “climate science denier” or “climate denier” to be used instead of “climate sceptic”

Anyone that does not 100% adhere to the convention wisdom is required to be labeled a “denier” by The Guardian. The term “denier” was selected, originally, for its association with “Holocaust denier” and is an intentional, pejorative propaganda term.

3.) Use “global heating” not “global warming”

4.) “greenhouse gas emissions” is preferred to “carbon emissions” or “carbon dioxide emissions”.

5.) Use “wildlife”, not “biodiversity”

6.) Use “fish populations” instead of “fish stocks”

Source: ‘It’s a crisis, not a change’: the six Guardian language changes on climate matters | Environment | The Guardian

The Guardian has adopted the language and methods of propaganda messaging, which is messaging designed to encourage the target to adopt some one else’s agenda.

Stick with the facts of CO2 rising, sea level ice and temperature changes, ice mass changes or risk tuning all of us out. Shrill terminology designed to create emotional outrage and responses is a total turn off. See our other posts on Climate Communications for more examples.

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