By hiding behind Section 230 exemption: Social media companies aid and abet cryptocurrency scams

By hiding behind Section 230 exemption: Social media companies aid and abet cryptocurrency scams

Spread the love

Social media companies argue that they are not responsible for criminal conduct on their platforms because Section 230 law:

Scammers hijack popular YouTube accounts and change their names so that they appear to be the official accounts of celebrities like Wozniak or companies like Apple. They then broadcast a “live” video showing old footage of the celebrity discussing cryptocurrency or related topics. Alongside the footage is text claiming that if someone sends bitcoin to a particular address, the celebrity would send back double the amount.

Along with Wozniak, the plaintiffs include more than a dozen individuals who were taken in by the scam, losing bitcoins worth anywhere from a few dollars to more than $40,000. In total, cryptocurrency scams like this have cost victims millions of dollars.

Source: Woz sues YouTube over “bitcoin giveaway” scam videos using his name | Ars Technica

Social media degenerates from a propaganda platform into criminal activities platform. Social media companies support criminal conduct by hiding behind Section 230, while simultaneously acting as an editor and publisher of non-criminal speech by deleting, censoring, shadow banning content based on non-public criteria. They want it both ways and so far, they get away with having it both ways.

After thought: A cryptocurrency scam was behind last week’s take over of Twitter by a small group of mostly teens (yes, really, teens). It’s as if cryptocurrency is, basically, a scam.

Comments are closed.