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Powell’s Books: Our [Non] Commitment to Free Speech

Powell’s Books: Our [Non] Commitment to Free Speech

Major bookstore pulls a book from its shelves after a group known for violence threatens the book store if they continue to carry the book. This, in turns, yields the Streisand Effect – those not aware of the book learn more about it because of the protest and decide to buy it.

It also raises questions about the roles of gatekeepers – the world’s largest independent book store is being forced to pull a book off its shelves.

Instagram’s new Data Policy – And why I deleted the Instagram app yesterday

Instagram’s new Data Policy – And why I deleted the Instagram app yesterday

Instagram introduced new Terms of Service, which caused many of us to re-read them, as well as the various linked policies. Facebook/Instagram log everything about you – including your SMS messages, your address book, information about nearby Wi-Fi access points, other devices on your network – and can integrate FB’s own collection with offline purchases at retail stores.

I had deleted the FB app long ago and last night I deleted the Instagram app. I do not believe it is safe to use any Facebook company application.

What social media [thinks they] know about us

What social media [thinks they] know about us

Social media compiles a dossier on each of us (even we do not belong to the platform) to understand us better than we understand ourselves. This information is then used to target advertising at us – basically finely targeted propaganda. Some times they are selling products, other times services, and some times ideas (politics). Regardless, their analysis has made some big misses about me 🙂

Privacy: Android and its app ecosystem are a massive surveillance system, invading all of your privacy

Privacy: Android and its app ecosystem are a massive surveillance system, invading all of your privacy

Behind the scenes, seemingly benign Android apps are scooping up huge amounts of private data about your life and sharing with third parties. We need to assume, apparently, that 100% of Android apps are spyware. This is why Android apps are “free” – when its free, you are the product.