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Category: Culture of Perpetual Outrage

Example of erroneous social media post gone viral-yet is factually incorrect

Example of erroneous social media post gone viral-yet is factually incorrect

A widely shared social media post about the Supreme Court contains 4 major errors according to an expert on law. Yet at the time of his writing, had been shared over 18,000 times on Facebook. Social media enables anyone to act as a propagandist, and once memes go viral, they become “facts” even though they are completely wrong.

Should professors have more free speech rights than others?

Should professors have more free speech rights than others?

If we engaged in widely publicized hateful or hurtful or vile speech, our employers would likely begin job termination procedures within 24 hours regardless of whether we made such comments in a private capacity or not. As the NY Times notes, “Speaking Freely About Politics Can Cost You Your Job“. Private sector workers ‘ “…don’t have the right to speak freely in the workplace.” Or even outside it.’ Unlike public sector workers: “… anyone who works for a government office,…

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It's the medium, not the message that is the problem

It's the medium, not the message that is the problem

Hoaxers impersonate legitimate reporters In the first incident, a perpetrator used a software tool to create two fake tweets that looked like they came from the account of Alex Harris, a Herald reporter preparing tributes to the slain students. One fake tweet asked for photos of dead bodies at the school and another asked if the shooter was white. The reporter almost immediately began getting angry messages. Source: Hoax attempts against Miami Herald augur broader information wars | McClatchy Washington…

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Do social media propagandists suffer from fragile egos?

Do social media propagandists suffer from fragile egos?

This linked piece was shared into my FB news feed. The item argues that President Trump suffers a fragile ego and is constantly looking for affirmation from others. The column says people seek to increase their “tribal self esteem” by strengthening their group membership, by, for example, spreading online propaganda messaging in support of their cause – and denigrating those who think otherwise (for any reason). The column quotes from Nathaniel Branden: “It would be hard to name a more…

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Social media propaganda poster implies world hunger is getting worse (but it's not) #socialmedia #propaganda

Social media propaganda poster implies world hunger is getting worse (but it's not) #socialmedia #propaganda

This came across my Facebook time line today: “The world’s hunger is getting ridiculous” – the word “getting” implies global hunger is getting worse – which is the message intended by this social media propaganda meme. Some types of shampoo may contain extracts of flowers or herbs and a few may contain extract of a fruit, but they are not significant components, by mass, of shampoo. This tidbit seems thrown in to encourage the target to feel guilty. In reality,…

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Much news reporting is pure speculation, not actual reporting

Much news reporting is pure speculation, not actual reporting

I ran across a link to an old CNN Money financial news report from October 24, 2016. Every speculation made in this news report was wrong and illustrates how much “news” is not really reporting on events but is speculation about the future. One week before the 2016 Presidential election, CNN Money’s report is titled A Trump win would sink stocks. What about Clinton? by Heather Long   @byHeatherLong Key points: If Donald Trump wins, U.S. stocks – and likely…

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