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Category: In Practice

Wow: FBI demands list of who read a USA Today news article

Wow: FBI demands list of who read a USA Today news article

WASHINGTON — USA TODAY is fighting a subpoena from the FBI demanding records that would identify readers of a February story about a southern Florida shooting that killed two agents and wounded three others. Source: USA TODAY fights FBI subpoena demanding records that would identify readers of Florida shooting story

When billionaires control our public discourse

When billionaires control our public discourse

Facebook, Twitter and Google outrageously censored scientists and doctors for asking questions about challenging issues in the pandemic. Today, we are recognizing that these discussions were important – but silenced by the unethical billionaires of social media.

The culture of perpetual outrage: “The harmful ableist language you unknowingly use”

The culture of perpetual outrage: “The harmful ableist language you unknowingly use”

This is what happens when we constantly seek out reasons to be perpetually outraged. The world is overrun with individuals who every day, intentionally seek out things to be outraged about. Common speech is now perceived as intentional and hurtful sleight to someone, somewhere. There is nothing we can say anymore without offending someone, somewhere. I have referred to concepts as “brain dead”, which is likely offensive to those with brain injuries. Which, should be obvious by now, includes me.

How lazy reporting can influence your thinking

How lazy reporting can influence your thinking

Laziness leads to Reuters showing a thumbnail graphic that is badly out of date, and which may mislead readers into thinking the Covid situation is much worse than it is now. This is not nefarious or intentional propaganda – it is most likely just laziness.

Another neat propaganda technique

Another neat propaganda technique

A “report” by an advocacy group opposes “vaccine nationalism” and says we need “a massive course correction” on vaccine distribution by redirecting “excess rich-country doses” to “poorer countries”. But they pulled a little trick in their description – twisting the facts.